Poodien

Don't look back in anger I

Don't look back in anger I

Poodien
100x100cm
Oil Paint on Outdoor Vinyl Material
2019

Don't look back in anger I

Poodien
100x100cm
Oil Paint on Outdoor Vinyl Material
2019

Artist Statement

The execution of the artwork by producing hand-painted reproduction of actual human figures over a flat surface (a wall) started with the site-specific work at the new upscale residency, business outlet and shopping malls development at Publika, Jalan Duta, Kuala Lumpur back in 2011. The work is a digital print on the public toilet’s walls that digitally reproduce the watercolor painting that depicted the representation of the actual migrant workers from behind who work at the beginning in the construction of that development project. The work mainly talks about the alienation of the worker from the product that they produce, and in that specific case, the separation of the Malaysia current migrants worker and the structure of the images and space that they constructed. The depiction of the ‘faceless’ workers in the enlarge watercolor painting to the size of actual human size was printed over the corridor’s blank white walls positioned starkly in the equal measured to each other leading to the male and female toilet. When the audience enters the toilet, they will get into the reproduction of a watercolor painting of construction tools and mirror image texts of selected essays by Guy Debord (artist, situationist) from the book “The Society of Spectacle” (1967) floating in the toilet’s wall. The texts were meant to be read when the audience/consumer participated in the work when they are looking at the mirror and having the reflection of their face in the mirror while reading it. The work is called the ‘Lonely Crowd’, the term that was originally a book tittle by David Riesman and two other authors (1950), but was introduced to the artist by Guy Debord who used the term in his book. The work in a similar style was extended to more work on canvas and paper in 2016 and 2018 (The Lonely Crowd II and III), but the human subject was broadened into random subjects in Kuala Lumpur, that makes Kuala Lumpur and it’s history as the constructed space and imagination in the contexts of the work.

In this new work (Don’t / Look Back In Anger) the similar strategy is applied to the work, only now that the subjects are painted over the 13th General Election propaganda/advertising outdoor billboard from 2013. This combination of two subjects is like the combination of two subjects of concern by the artist in dealing with the issue of human migration, identity and the idea of representation from colonial representation to the present. The object and subject of state propaganda especially from the GE13 election were the main subjects in the artist’s solo show in 2013, called “Becoming’. GE13 were being touted as the mother of all election and was expected by political pundits that the Opposition alliance, Pakatan Rakyat to has credible chance to end the 56 years of Barisan rule. The pre GE13 election campaign was one of the most intense battles of winning the people sentiment and at the front of this battle is the image production – propaganda or political advertising. By sandwiching the audience, the hand-painted current Kuala Lumpur subjects and also basic shapes like circle and triangle in the grid located in between the audience and the found mass-produced image of the last General Election campaign before the latest Election (GE14) that witnessed the regime change, the artist is trying to invite audience to realise the separation between the everyday reality and the image that were presented in the consciousness of the state, at the same time to scrutinize the materiality of production and also to question our ability for the new (im)possibilities of imagination of social-political relation in it’s physical and non-physical borders in the age of the current eroded state structure’s imagination melted by the fast information age and technological democratization in dissemination of images reproduction that set a new challenge to the audience, artist, and the authoritarian-ship in image production and social reality.

Don't look back in anger II

Don't look back in anger II

Poodien
100x100cm
Oil Paint on Outdoor Vinyl Material
2019

Don't look back in anger II

Poodien
100x100cm
Oil Paint on Outdoor Vinyl Material
2019

Artist Statement

The execution of the artwork by producing hand-painted reproduction of actual human figures over a flat surface (a wall) started with the site-specific work at the new upscale residency, business outlet and shopping malls development at Publika, Jalan Duta, Kuala Lumpur back in 2011. The work is a digital print on the public toilet’s walls that digitally reproduce the watercolor painting that depicted the representation of the actual migrant workers from behind who work at the beginning in the construction of that development project. The work mainly talks about the alienation of the worker from the product that they produce, and in that specific case, the separation of the Malaysia current migrants worker and the structure of the images and space that they constructed. The depiction of the ‘faceless’ workers in the enlarge watercolor painting to the size of actual human size was printed over the corridor’s blank white walls positioned starkly in the equal measured to each other leading to the male and female toilet. When the audience enters the toilet, they will get into the reproduction of a watercolor painting of construction tools and mirror image texts of selected essays by Guy Debord (artist, situationist) from the book “The Society of Spectacle” (1967) floating in the toilet’s wall. The texts were meant to be read when the audience/consumer participated in the work when they are looking at the mirror and having the reflection of their face in the mirror while reading it. The work is called the ‘Lonely Crowd’, the term that was originally a book tittle by David Riesman and two other authors (1950), but was introduced to the artist by Guy Debord who used the term in his book. The work in a similar style was extended to more work on canvas and paper in 2016 and 2018 (The Lonely Crowd II and III), but the human subject was broadened into random subjects in Kuala Lumpur, that makes Kuala Lumpur and it’s history as the constructed space and imagination in the contexts of the work.

In this new work (Don’t / Look Back In Anger) the similar strategy is applied to the work, only now that the subjects are painted over the 13th General Election propaganda/advertising outdoor billboard from 2013. This combination of two subjects is like the combination of two subjects of concern by the artist in dealing with the issue of human migration, identity and the idea of representation from colonial representation to the present. The object and subject of state propaganda especially from the GE13 election were the main subjects in the artist’s solo show in 2013, called “Becoming’. GE13 were being touted as the mother of all election and was expected by political pundits that the Opposition alliance, Pakatan Rakyat to has credible chance to end the 56 years of Barisan rule. The pre GE13 election campaign was one of the most intense battles of winning the people sentiment and at the front of this battle is the image production – propaganda or political advertising. By sandwiching the audience, the hand-painted current Kuala Lumpur subjects and also basic shapes like circle and triangle in the grid located in between the audience and the found mass-produced image of the last General Election campaign before the latest Election (GE14) that witnessed the regime change, the artist is trying to invite audience to realise the separation between the everyday reality and the image that were presented in the consciousness of the state, at the same time to scrutinize the materiality of production and also to question our ability for the new (im)possibilities of imagination of social-political relation in it’s physical and non-physical borders in the age of the current eroded state structure’s imagination melted by the fast information age and technological democratization in dissemination of images reproduction that set a new challenge to the audience, artist, and the authoritarian-ship in image production and social reality.

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